CORRECTING THE PROBLEM

July 26, 2012

Lowering a 1200 a lot and keeping the stock length castor arms is like a rough night out with your mates on the booze. You have fun and everything is going great but it gets to a point and you bail/miss judge the fence jump/walk into something you shouldn’t and now you can’t self centre when you’re walking. The problem I found in the past when drifting my truck is that the front edge of the wheel sits really close to the front edge of the wheel arch so instead of just shortening the castor arms to solve my loss of castor, I’m left with the options of either cutting the gaurds and loosing the smooth factor curve or running skinnier wheels (which wasn’t about to happen).

Instead of either of those options I’ve re-drilled the holes in the top of the strut tower by 30 degrees and effectively shifted the top of the shock towards the firewall by about 20mm. I’ve also filed out the camber plates a bit more to gain back the camber you loose when rotating the camber plate. Using our pal Pythagoras’ theorem, I can estimate an increase of about 2 degrees of castor. With other variables no doubt having an impact on the result – more mass up front, stiffer front springs and a wet track – it’s helped a lot, well obviously, but enough for me to notice a pick up in the amount the steering will self centre and rotate the wheels when switching. A pleasant change from normally having to fight the steering wheel into each switch. I definitely recommend the aforementioned modification if shortening the castor arms is posing similar problems as what I face. My sunny truck isn’t very pretty (is mustard with rust proofing surrounding it ever pretty?) but it now drifts and drives a lot nicer!